Prior Programs

2020 Programs

Advanced Skills Therapists Need to Promote Change through the Therapeutic Relationship

Douglas Morrison, Ph.D., Marian Sharkey, Ph.D., Annemarie Slobig, Psy.D., Patricia Walker, Ph.D.

Senior clinicians discussed how therapists can promote change through the therapeutic relationship by developing advanced skills, illustrated using case material, in the following areas:

  1. Understanding and responding to patients’ process communications (often indirect) of their ongoing experiences in the therapeutic relationship in developing, maintaining, and deepening the alliance and promoting intrapsychic development and behavior change.
  2. Recognizing the conflicts clients have about making changes in therapy through listening for the contradictory motives they unknowingly express in their communications. This recognition then permits therapists to respond more accurately to where the client is at and can prevent clients from feeling alienated, misunderstood or prematurely ending treatment.
  3. Using reflective awareness to consider complex factors guiding decisions about whether and how to self-disclose in treatment relationships, including exploring whether the desire to share one's own experience or opinion is in the service of promoting therapeutic motives or personal motives that might lead the process off track.
  4. Recognizing forms of progress in psychotherapy that are often not visible to patients, and in turn, helping patients be aware of and more confident about the progress they are making.

Saturday, March 7, 2020, 1:30-4:30pm | The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, 325 N. Wells, Chicago, IL 60654

3 CEs for Psychologists, Professional Counselors, and Social Workers

Presenters

Douglas Morrison, Ph.D.
Dr. Morrison is a clinical psychologist in independent practice for over 30 years. He is an assistant clinical professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, where he is involved in the training of doctoral-level interns in clinical psychology, and coordinates diversity training for that program. He is a member of the Medical Staff (Doctoral Level Health Professional) at Northwestern Medicine. Previously, he has worked as a staff psychologist and ambulatory services associate director at Northwestern Medicine’s Chemical Dependence Program, and as a clinical team leader at that hospital’s Rehabilitation Program for patients with serious psychiatric disorders. He is a member of the American Psychological Association, the Intrapsychic Humanism Society, and the Illinois Psychological Association, and has served on IPA's Ethics Committee, providing consultation and adjudication for the organization and its members.

Marian Sharkey, Ph.D.
Dr. Sharkey is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in private practice with over 25 years experience working with adults, children and families in a variety of inpatient and outpatient community mental health and hospital settings. Dr. Sharkey received her M.S.W. and Ph.D. from the School of Social Work at Loyola University Chicago where she was the founding editor-in-chief of the school's journal, Praxis: Where Reflection & Practice Meet. She is an adjunct faculty member in the School of Social Work at Loyola University and has also taught at the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. Dr. Sharkey has presented at local and national conferences on the topics of the reflective use of theory in clinical practice, trauma-informed treatment, promoting student scholarship in social work education, and the theoretical principles and practice of Inner Humanism. She is on the board of the Intrapsychic Humanism Society and serves as Secretary.

Annemarie Slobig, Psy.D.
Dr. Slobig is a clinical psychologist and the chair of the Clinical Psychology Department at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology in Chicago. Previously she led the PsyD program at the Illinois School of Professional Psychology where she served in leadership roles for over 20 years. Dr. Slobig has worked in a wide variety of clinical settings, including inpatient and outpatient hospitals, residential treatment, community mental health, transitional housing, and independent practice. Dr. Slobig is a member of the American Psychological Association, the Society for Humanistic Psychology (APA Division 32), and the Intrapsychic Humanism Society (IHS) and serves on the IHS board. She also has interests in group and organizational dynamics, group relations training, supervisory processes, and therapist development - especially as they pertain to personal growth and learning about diversity. She has a private psychotherapy and consultation practice in Oak Park, IL.

Patricia Walker, Ph.D.
Dr. Walker is a licensed clinical psychologist in private practice with over thirty years experience providing psychotherapy for adults experiencing difficulties in their personal and professional lives. She also provides psychotherapy consultation to mental health professionals. Dr. Walker is President of the Intrasychic Humanism Society. She is also Chair of the Women’s Issues Section of the Illinois Psychological Association. She is on Faculty at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, serving on the selection and training committee of the clinical psychology doctoral internship, and teaching a seminar on ethics in reflective practice. She is a member of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Walker has given professional talks on ethics in reflective practice, Inner Humanism psychotherapy, and helping women develop stable self-esteem and minds of their own, as well as talks to the general public on overcoming gender bias and work-life balance.



2019 Programs

BREAKING NEWS!: How Psychotherapists, Teachers, Parents and Other Caregivers Can Help Children and Teens Cope with Traumatic News in the Media and When Trauma Occurs in Their Communities

Carla Beatrici, Psy.D. and Felicia Owens, Psy.D.

Modern advances in technology have enhanced and improved our lives in many ways. While there are benefits to having information at our fingertips, it can be overwhelming for both children and adults to navigate this new world. How can adult caregivers help children digest the traumatic events they are exposed to on the news, the internet, social media and even in their own communities? The presentation will provide an overview of the negative effects traumatic news can have on children and articulate how caregivers can best help children cope. Special consideration will be given to helping children, including racial minority children, who are exposed to violence in their own communities--when the breaking news is real life news. The presentation will emphasize: (1) the importance of caregivers being available to listen to how children are feeling and providing a close relationship children can turn to for help with losses and their feelings; (2) how parents and caregivers can best regulate access to digital media to protect children and reduce exposure to traumatic information; (3) the value of adult caregivers getting help with their own intense reactions to traumatic events and of protecting children from these reactions.

October 5, 2019, 2-5pm | Loyola University, Lewis Tower, Beane Hall, 13th Floor, 111 E. Pearson, Chicago IL 60611

2 CEs for Psychologists, Professional Counselors, and Social Workers

Presenters

Carla M. Beatrici, Psy.D.
Dr. Beatrici received her Psy.D. at the Illinois School of Professional Psychology. She is a Clinical Psychologist with over 25 years of experience providing psychotherapy to individuals of all ages, with a specialization in child and adolescent mental health and the area of trauma. Dr. Beatrici is the Director of Clinical Services of an outpatient, not-for-profit organization called, Smart Love Family Services, located in Oak Park and Chicago, where she oversees and supervises 25 clinical staff. Dr. Beatrici has developed and implemented staff training programs on child development for mental health and medical professionals in many settings, including Easter Seals, Early Head Start, the American Medical Association, and formerly Children’s Memorial Hospital. For the past 18 years, Dr. Beatrici has been on the adjunct faculty at Loyola University Medical Center as a Clinical Assistant Professor, where she sees patients and teaches Developmental Theories to psychiatry residents.

Felicia Owens, Psy.D.
Dr. Felicia M. Owens received her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the Illinois School of Professional Psychology. Dr. Owens is a psychotherapist at Smart Love Family Services and also serves as the Director of Minority Families Program. She has more than 15 years of experience providing psychotherapy to adults, parents, families and children in various settings, including private practice, community churches, DCFS, inpatient psychiatric hospitals and college counseling centers. Dr. Owens has worked in a range of capacities with minority families, strengthening service delivery to their communities and addressing the multicultural factors that exist for these families. Dr. Owen’s upbringing as a Black woman in underserved areas on the West Side of Chicago established her interests in the expansion of her multicultural competence and informed the experiences she has gravitated towards, including gun violence trauma relief and the de-stigmatization of mental illness for at risk populations. She is the founder of Dr Owens Speaks, a Faith-Based Wellness Firm devoted to helping others incorporate their faith and mental health while walking their destined path to purpose.

Contemporary Ethical Dilemmas in the Psychotherapy Relationship: A Reflective Approach

Susan S. Zoline, Ph.D.

This workshop will address contemporary and sometimes vexing ethical dilemmas which arise in clinical practice, requiring clinicians to make difficult judgments regarding perceived benefit and potential harm to our clients and other impacted parties. Topics will include confidentiality/disclosure of information (particularly with regard to children, teens and families), management of high risk or crisis situations such as suicide and risk of violence towards others, and emerging standards regarding the interface of technology and psychotherapy. Special emphasis will be placed upon the centrality of the psychotherapy relationship and its foundation of trust and integrity, as well as the critical role of therapist self-reflection, as each of these factors is essential in providing ethically optimal care. Strategies for utilizing informed decision making while balancing clinical, ethical, legal and risk management considerations will be presented. Case vignettes will be examined and group discussion will be integrated into the presentation to illustrate the grey areas surrounding these complex issues.

October 5, 2019, 2-5pm | Loyola University, Lewis Tower, Beane Hall, 13th Floor, 111 E. Pearson, Chicago IL 60611

3 Ethics CEs for Social Workers, Psychologists, and Professional Counselors

Presenter

Susan Zoline, Ph.D.
Dr. Zoline is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist who has been involved in practicing, teaching and consulting in the Chicago area for over thirty-five years. Dr. Zoline was a Professor of Psychology and University Fellow at the Illinois School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University, Chicago, where she taught clinical masters and doctoral students for thirty years. More recently, Dr. Zoline is a Clinical Faculty in the Psy.D. program in Clinical Psychology at Adler University. Dr. Zoline’s areas of professional expertise include professional ethics, suicide, violence and abuse assessment and intervention, clinical supervision and risk management. Dr. Zoline is a longstanding member of the Illinois Psychological Association Ethics Committee which she currently Co-Chairs. She has worked clinically in a broad variety of settings and regularly consults and provides workshops to mental health and other professionals both locally and nationally on topics related to professional ethics.

Co-Sponsored by the Women's Issues Section of the Illinois Psychological Association

Q:
“In the Cultural Awakening of the #MeToo Movement, How Can Psychotherapists Help?”
   
A:
“Using the Therapeutic Relationship to Build Her Inner Strength, Resistance to Mistreatment, and Pursuit of Mutually Caring Relationships”

Carla Beatrici, Psy.D., Marian Sharkey, Ph.D., Tamara Garrity, Psy.D., and Michael Zakalik, Psy.D.

Experienced psychotherapists discussed the impact negative gender related messages can have on female teens and adults. Using clinical material from teen and adult cases, the presenters described how the therapeutic relationship can strengthen and stabilize genuine, internalized self-worth, constructive self-caretaking, and pursuit of mutually caring interpersonal relationships. The presenters included how to help female teens and women within the therapeutic relationship develop their own minds, take themselves seriously, care for themselves while also caring for others, use their voices to share losses and mistreatment in relationships, stand up for themselves, and turn away from relationships that are harmful to them. They addressed how male therapists can think about their roles, and how to help parents provide accurate caregiving responses that foster genuine self-worth. There was plenty of time for questions and discussion with audience participants.

June 22, 2019, 3-5pm | Loyola University, Lewis Tower, Beane Hall, 13th Floor, 111 E. Pearson, Chicago IL 60611

2 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Professional Counselors

Presenters

Carla M. Beatrici, Psy.D.
Dr. Carla Beatrici is a Clinical Psychologist with over 25 years of clinical experience with a specialization in child and adolescent mental health. Dr. Beatrici is the Director of Clinical Services of Smart Love Family Services. Dr. Beatrici is an adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor at Loyola Medical Center.

 

Marian Sharkey, Ph.D., LCSW
Dr. Sharkey is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with 25 years of clinical experience in inpatient and outpatient hospital settings, community mental health, and private practice. She is an adjunct faculty member in the School of Social Work at Loyola University Chicago and has been an instructor at the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago.

 

Tamara T. Garrity, Psy.D.
Dr. Tamara Garrity is a Clinical Psychologist with over 20 years of experience. She is the Director of Training and Staff Supervisor at Smart Love Family Services. Along with treating patients, she manages the Internship and Postdoctoral training program. Dr. Garrity is a bilingual, Spanish-speaking psychologist.

 

Michael Zakalik, Psy.D.
Dr. Michael Zakalik is a licensed clinical psychologist with over 15 years of experience working with diverse populations of children, adolescents, parents and adults. Dr. Zakalik supervises doctoral candidates and staff at Smart Love Family Services. He has provided parent education seminars on important mental health topics.

When Our Choices Are Not Really Our Own: How Hidden Motives for Unhappiness Keep Us from Creating the Life We Truly Want, and What Can Be Done

Martha Heineman Pieper, Ph.D.

Dr. Martha Heineman Pieper presented a new understanding of what goes wrong when choices are unfree, namely that an unrecognized addiction to unhappiness lies behind many of the large and small decisions individuals experience as freely chosen. She suggested ways in which parents, therapists, teachers, and individuals can enhance their ability to help others as well as themselves develop the capacity to make good choices that are not in the service of hidden agendas. Dr. Pieper framed her understanding in the broader context of selected philosophical and psychological views of freedom of choice while illuminating some limitations of these views.

Saturday April 13, 2019, 3-5pm | Loyola University, Lewis Tower, Beane Hall, 13th Floor, 111 E. Pearson, Chicago IL 60611

2 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Professional Counselors

Presenter

Martha Heineman Pieper, Ph.D.
Dr. Pieper is an author and psychotherapist who works with children and parents, and serves as a consultant to agencies and other mental health professionals. She is a founding board member of Smart Love Family Services, for which she provides ongoing consultation and insight to the clinical and early childhood education staff. She also serves on the Board of the Intrapsychic Humanism Society. Both of these non-profit agencies are based on Intrapsychic Humanism, the comprehensive psychology of child development, psychopathology and treatment developed by Dr. Pieper and her late husband, William J. Pieper, MD.

Dr. Pieper authored two best-selling, award winning children's books, Mommy, Daddy, I Had a Bad Dream! and Jilly's Terrible Temper Tantrums: And How She Outgrew Them. And she co-authored with Dr. William Pieper the best-selling parenting book, Smart Love: The Comprehensive Guide to Understanding, Regulating, and Enjoying Your Child; the popular adult self-help book, Addicted to Unhappiness: How Hidden Motives for Unhappiness Keep You From Creating the Life You Truly Want, And What You Can Do (2nd Edition); and Intrapsychic Humanism: An Introduction to a Comprehensive Psychology and Philosophy of Mind. She has written and presented on Inner Humanism psychotherapy, and also on applications of the theory of Intrapsychic Humanism to teaching, parenting, foster care, the question of free will, and children’s dreams and fantasy life, among other topics.



2017 Programs

Relationships in the Time of Alexa and Siri


David S. Friedman, MBA

If you text, use FaceTime, or use Facebook you know that technology is altering how people build personal and professional relationships. In this talk, we'll look at how creative use of technology can enhance remote and face-to-face relationships in professional relationships. We'll share a way to assess whether technological tools can support and advance the relationship experience you are trying to provide. With technology, rich and valuable relationships have been created in ways previously believed to be impossible, unthinkable, or very costly. Following the presentation we will invite discussion about experiences, questions and concerns related to internet technology.


Friday, June 9, 2017, 6-8pm | Loyola University, Lewis Tower, Beane Hall, 13th Floor, 111 E. Pearson, Chicago IL 60611

2 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Professional Counselors

Presenter

David Friedman, MBA
David Friedman has lengthy experience with Intrapsychic Humanism, including as the Treasurer for Smart Love Family Services. He has experience applying IH principles in business through his firm Bridgewell Partners and an online problem-solving group called Collaborating Minds. He currently is a faculty member and designs Executive Education programs for Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management. He has a particular interest in how technology can be used to support education and relationship-building.

Effective Treatment of Older Adults with Substance Use Disorders


Fran Schnadig, MSW, LCSW

Aging brings physical, emotional and social challenges and losses which can lead to the intensification or emergence of alcohol, prescription medication or drug problems. Intrapsychic Humanism treatment principles provide a highly individualized, respectful, flexible and holistic treatment approach that effectively meets the specialized treatment needs of older adults with substance use disorders and results in higher-than average treatment outcomes. The seminar will explore and discuss specialized treatment needs of older adults with substance use disorders as well as effective principles of treatment. We will work together on case examples and we urge participants to bring their own questions to the seminar.

Friday, February 24, 2017, 6:00-8:00 p.m. | Loyola University, Lewis Tower, Beane Hall, 13th Floor, 111 E. Pearson, Chicago IL 60611

2 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Professional Counselors

Presenter

Fran Schnadig, MSW, LCSW
Fran Schnadig has been providing specialized treatment of older adults with substance use disorders for the past 17 years. She designed and implemented the award-winning Healing Connections Older Adult Treatment Program at PEER Services, Inc. in Evanston, in 2000. This unique substance use disorder outpatient program is based on Intrapsychic Humanism principles which resonate with the subjective experiences of older adult clients and result in higher-than-average treatment outcomes. Fran currently is in private practice in Evanston, continuing to provide outpatient treatment to older adults who struggle with substance use disorders.



2016 Programs

Diversity Workshop: How Social Identity Group Memberships Make A Difference


Winifred E. Scott, Ph.D. and Bill Gregory

Professionals across all service areas frequently interact with clients, colleagues, patients, and students from different sociocultural backgrounds than their own. In this professional development workshop, Dr. Winifred E. Scott and Mr. Bill Gregory will help social workers, psychologists, professional counselors, teachers and others deepen their awareness of how the Social Identity Group Memberships of their clients, colleagues, and themselves can play a role in the planning, communication and delivery of their services.

Dr. Scott and Mr. Gregory will present and discuss in depth eight Social Identity Group Memberships with the aim of helping participants use their own varied cultural backgrounds in a reflective manner. Small groups will discuss and raise questions about Social Identity Group Memberships and anecdotal material from cases involving diversity issues will be explored.

Saturday, October 22, 2016, 2:00-5:00 p.m. | Loyola University, Lewis Tower, Beane Hall, 13th Floor, 111 E. Pearson, Chicago IL 60611

3 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Professional Counselors

**This seminar satisfies the Cultural Competency CE requirement for social workers**

Presenters

Dr. Winifred E. Scott
Dr. Winifred Scott is an organizational development consultant and an executive coach specializing in communication skills and cultural diversity. She has a Ph.D. in education from the University of Chicago.

Bill Gregory
Bill Gregory is a corporate consultant who works with Dr. Scott helping clients from diverse professional organizations and industries.

Ethics in Reflective Practice


Patricia Walker, Ph.D.

In this presentation, Dr. Patricia Walker will discuss how ethical practice arises out of a reflective capacity, itself the product of ongoing professional development, which enables psychologists, social workers, and professional counselors to distinguish and regulate personal feelings, values and interests in favor of therapeutic goals (Pieper, 1999). In contrast, Dr. Walker will illustrate how lapses by psychotherapists - when they unknowingly pursue personal rather than therapeutic motives - set the stage for ethics and risk management missteps and sub-optimal patient care. We will discuss a wide variety of lapses caused by personal interests.

Saturday, April 9, 2016, 2-5pm | Loyola University, Lewis Tower, Beane Hall, 13th Floor, 111 E. Pearson, Chicago IL 60611

3 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Professional Counselors

Presenter

Patricia Walker, Ph.D.
Dr. Walker is a licensed clinical psychologist in private practice with over thirty years experience providing psychotherapy for adults experiencing difficulties in their personal and professional lives. She also provides psychotherapy consultation to mental health professionals. Dr. Walker is President of the Intrasychic Humanism Society. She is also Chair of the Women’s Issues Section of the Illinois Psychological Association. She is on Faculty at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, serving on the selection and training committee of the clinical psychology doctoral internship, and teaching a seminar on ethics in reflective practice. She is a member of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Walker has given professional talks on ethics in reflective practice, Inner Humanism psychotherapy, and helping women develop stable self-esteem and minds of their own, as well as talks to the general public on overcoming gender bias and work-life balance.



2015 Programs

Are You Married? Who Did You Vote For?: Guidelines for Therapist Self-Disclosure


Martha Heineman Pieper, Ph.D.

Therapist self-disclosure is a powerful technique that should never “just happen.” In contrast to most other psychotherapies, Inner Humanism does not take an ideological stance toward therapist self-disclosure – Inner Humanism neither prescribes it nor proscribes it – but rather tailors therapist self-disclosure to the specifics of the therapist-client relationship. Abundant case material will illustrate the guidelines therapists can use to make informed decisions about whether self-disclosure would or would not advance clients’ inner well-being and self-regulatory stability. “Self-disclosure” will include both non-discretionary forms of self-disclosure, such as the therapist’s illness, pregnancy, or retirement, and also discretionary forms of self-disclosure, such as positive or negative feelings toward the client, giving advice, or details about the therapist’s life and personal preferences. This presentation will also address and illustrate with case material guidelines for self-disclosure specific to the treatment of children and adolescents.

Saturday, October 3, 2015, 2:00-5:00 p.m. | Loyola University, Lewis Tower, Beane Hall, 13th Floor, 111 E. Pearson, Chicago IL 60611

3 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Professional Counselors

**This seminar satisfies the Ethics CE requirement for social workers**

Presenter

Martha Heineman Pieper, Ph.D.
Dr. Pieper is an author and psychotherapist who works with children and parents, and serves as a consultant to agencies and other mental health professionals. She is a founding board member of Smart Love Family Services, for which she provides ongoing consultation and insight to the clinical and early childhood education staff. She also serves on the Board of the Intrapsychic Humanism Society. Both of these non-profit agencies are based on Intrapsychic Humanism, the comprehensive psychology of child development, psychopathology and treatment developed by Dr. Pieper and her late husband, William J. Pieper, MD.

Dr. Pieper authored two best-selling, award winning children's books, Mommy, Daddy, I Had a Bad Dream! and Jilly's Terrible Temper Tantrums: And How She Outgrew Them. And she co-authored with Dr. William Pieper the best-selling parenting book, Smart Love: The Comprehensive Guide to Understanding, Regulating, and Enjoying Your Child; the popular adult self-help book, Addicted to Unhappiness: How Hidden Motives for Unhappiness Keep You From Creating the Life You Truly Want, And What You Can Do (2nd Edition); and Intrapsychic Humanism: An Introduction to a Comprehensive Psychology and Philosophy of Mind. She has written and presented on Inner Humanism psychotherapy, and also on applications of the theory of Intrapsychic Humanism to teaching, parenting, foster care, the question of free will, and children’s dreams and fantasy life, among other topics.

DNA is Not Destiny: How Nurturing Regulates Heredity


Katherine L. Knight, Ph.D.

The age-old debate, nature vs. nurture, has never been resolved. How much of human development is due to heredity (nature), and how much is due to environment (nurture)? Exciting new research shows that our DNA (nature) does not function autonomously, but instead it needs instructions to know when and where to be active. Some of these instructions are provided by environmental factors such as nutrition and caregiving. In this lecture, we will explore how the environment of early childhood can provide instructions to our DNA leading to altered traits that can be passed on to the next generation.

Friday, May 1, 2015, 6:00- 8:00 p.m.| Loyola University, Lewis Tower, Beane Hall, 13th Floor, 111 E. Pearson, Chicago IL 60611

2 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Professional Counselors

Presenter

Dr. Katherine Knight
Dr. Knight is Professor and Chairperson of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Loyola University Chicago Stricht School of Medicine and has taught immunology and genetics to medical and graduate students for more than twenty-five years. She has more than one hundred publications and has held research grants from the National Institutes of Health for more than thirty years. She has served as President of the American Association of Immunologists (AAI), an organization of over six thousand immunologists in the United States. In 2013, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the AAI. She has also served on multiple advisory groups for the National Institutes of Health and on editorial boards of journals in her field. She lectures both nationally and internationally on topics similar to that to be covered in this presentation.

Basic Blue Q&A: Follow Up to the Short Course on Intrapsychic Humanism


Catherine Croxson, M.F.A., Katherine L. Knight, Ph.D., Walter D. Miller, L.C.S.W., Marian Sharkey, Ph.D., Mark L. Steinberg, Ph.D., Judy Storey Maritato, M.B.A.

To start off the new year we will be hosting a post-Basic Blue Q&A panel discussion on Friday, February 27th from 6-8pm, with a light supper being served at 5pm. We had a terrific turnout for the Basic Blue weekend course held in September and appreciate all of you who were able to participate. It was a stimulating weekend and generated some follow up questions to which we would like to respond:

  • Is the expression of inner unhappiness a symptom or a pursuit of a motive to be unhappy?
  • What does it mean to be "intrapsychic"?
  • Regarding personal motives as they arise in the psychotherapy treatment process -- how are they identified and regulated?
  • How is the Romantic Phase experienced in non-traditional families?

Each question will be addressed by a panelist followed by plenty of time for participant discussion. We also welcome any other questions you may have about the theory of Intrapsychic Humanism. Participation in the Basic Blue weekend course last September is not required to attend this Q&A. We hope you are able to join us and we look forward to learning more together about the ideas and ideals of Intrapsychic Humanism.

Friday, February 27, 2015, 6-8pm | Loyola University, Lewis Tower, Beane Hall, 13th Floor, 111 E. Pearson, Chicago IL 60611

2 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Professional Counselors

Presenters

Catherine Croxson, M.F.A.
Catherine Croxson is an abstract painter who has taught painting at the School of the Art Institute.

Katherine L. Knight, Ph.D.
Dr. Knight is Professor and Chairperson of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

Walter D. Miller, L.C.S.W.
Walter Miller is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and has conducted a private practice of psychotherapy since 1976. He also provides consultation and supervision to other mental health professionals.

Marian Sharkey, Ph.D.
Dr. Sharkey is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and has been providing psychotherapy in private practice for over fifteen years. She is also on the clinical staff in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Northwestern Medical Faculty Foundation.

Mark L. Steinberg, Ph.D.
Dr. Steinberg is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and has been in the private practice of psychotherapy for over thirty years. He also provides consultation and supervision to other mental health professionals.

Judy Storey Maritato, M.B.A.
Judy Storey Maritato is the Executive Director of Research Dynamics, a research consultancy specializing in business-to-business and industrial market research encompassing diverse methodological and analytical approaches.



2014 Programs

Basic Blue: A Short Course on Intrapsychic Humanism


Catherine Croxson, M.F.A., Katherine L. Knight, Ph.D., Walter D. Miller, L.C.S.W., Marian Sharkey, Ph.D., Mark L. Steinberg, Ph.D., Judy Storey Maritato, M.B.A.

The members of the board of the Intrapsychic Humanism Society will offer a short course on the theory of intrapsychic humanism. The seminar will follow the chapter structure of the book ,Intrapsychic Humanism (1990) by Martha Heineman Pieper, Ph.D. and William J. Pieper, M.D. We will present some of the key points in the book in everyday language with the goal of enhancing your enjoyment of reading the book. The seminar is designed for those new to the theory, as well as those familiar with the principles of the theory who wish to further deepen their study.

Saturday, September 27, 2014, 12:45-5:30pm and Sunday, September 28, 2014, 10:00am-3:30pm | Loyola University, Lewis Tower, Beane Hall, 13th Floor, 111 E. Pearson, Chicago IL 60611

10 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Professional Counselors

Presenters

Catherine Croxson, M.F.A.
Catherine Croxson is an abstract painter who has taught painting at the School of the Art Institute.

Katherine L. Knight, Ph.D.
Dr. Knight is Professor and Chairperson of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

Walter D. Miller, L.C.S.W.
Walter D. Miller is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and has conducted a private practice of psychotherapy since 1976. He also provides consultation and supervision to other mental health professionals.

Marian Sharkey, Ph.D.
Dr. Sharkey is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and has been providing psychotherapy in private practice for over fifteen years. She is also on the clinical staff in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Northwestern Medical Faculty Foundation.

Mark L. Steinberg, Ph.D.
Dr. Steinberg is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and has been in the private practice of psychotherapy for over thirty years. He also provides consultation and supervision to other mental health professionals.

Judy Storey Maritato, M.B.A.
Judy Storey Maritato is the Executive Director of Research Dynamics, a research consultancy specializing in business-to-business and industrial market research encompassing diverse methodological and analytical approaches.

Intrapsychic Humanism in the Workplace: Interpersonal Problem-Solving and Negotiation/Conflict-Resolution


Robert B. Carroll, AM, MBA

Whether you work in a social service agency or a medical, educational or business setting, situations often occur where people need to problem-solve and come to an agreement on issues. People may bring different viewpoints to the problem; some may have conflicting goals, and others may hold strong personal feelings about what outcomes are acceptable. Intrapsychic Humanism offers perceptions and principles that provide a means to understand the viewpoints of others and of oneself, as well as the goals and personal feelings that shape these viewpoints. This presentation will illustrate how applying the principles of Intrapsychic Humanism can help create trust and a reflective relationship “space” during the negotiation/conflict-resolution process, creating an opportunity for mutual exchange of information and problem-solving.

Friday April 4, 2014, 6-8 pm | The Illinois School of Professional Psychology, 225 N. Michigan Avenue, Suite 1300, Chicago, IL 60601

2 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Professional Counselors

Presenters

Robert B. Carroll, AM, MBA
Robert Carroll has been a member of the board of the intrapsychic humanism society. He attended college in chicago at roosevelt university, graduating with a ba in history in 1978. In 1980 he received an am degree from the university of chicago’s school of social service administration (casework) and in 1990 an mba degree from the university of chicago’s graduate school of business (finance and strategy).

From 1980 to 1988 he was a clinical social worker at northwestern memorial hospital’s stone institute of psychiatry working with inpatients, families, groups and individuals. In 1990, after receiving his mba, he began a management consulting career working with a wide range of medical centers on business issues such as capital investment planning, medical staff development and budgeting. For 15 years, he worked with two chicago-area consulting firms with national health care practices, kaufman, hall & associates, inc. And strata decision technology, llc. In 2005 he left consulting and took a senior management position at ann & robert h. Lurie children’s hospital of chicago, formerly children’s memorial hospital, focusing on business project planning and developing information infrastructure. He retired from lurie children’s in august 2013 and has since been involved with travel and speaking projects relating to the betterment of workplace relationships.



2013 Programs

Monsters Under the Bed and Superheroes in the Playroom: Helpful Responses to Children's Dreams and Fantasy Play


Martha Heineman Pieper, Ph.D.

Children communicate differently from adults. Understood correctly, children’s dreams and imaginative play convey wishes and concerns that children are incapable of articulating more directly. This talk will provide parents, teachers, and other caregivers with insights into the meaning of children’s dreams and fantasy play and will offer helpful ways to respond. Informed responses to children’s dreams and fantasy play will enhance children’s emotional health and strengthen their affectionate ties to the caring adults in their lives.

November 16, 2013, 1:30-2:30pm | PEGGY NOTEBAERT NATURE MUSEUM, 2430 North Cannon Drive, Chicago, IL 60614

1 CE for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Professional Counselors

Presenter

Martha Heineman Pieper, Ph.D.
Dr. Pieper is an author and psychotherapist who works with children and parents, and serves as a consultant to agencies and other mental health professionals. She is a founding board member of Smart Love Family Services, for which she provides ongoing consultation and insight to the clinical and early childhood education staff. She also serves on the Board of the Intrapsychic Humanism Society. Both of these non-profit agencies are based on Intrapsychic Humanism, the comprehensive psychology of child development, psychopathology and treatment developed by Dr. Pieper and her late husband, William J. Pieper, MD.

Dr. Pieper authored two best-selling, award winning children's books, Mommy, Daddy, I Had a Bad Dream! and Jilly's Terrible Temper Tantrums: And How She Outgrew Them. And she co-authored with Dr. William Pieper the best-selling parenting book, Smart Love: The Comprehensive Guide to Understanding, Regulating, and Enjoying Your Child; the popular adult self-help book, Addicted to Unhappiness: How Hidden Motives for Unhappiness Keep You From Creating the Life You Truly Want, And What You Can Do (2nd Edition); and Intrapsychic Humanism: An Introduction to a Comprehensive Psychology and Philosophy of Mind. She has written and presented on Inner Humanism psychotherapy, and also on applications of the theory of Intrapsychic Humanism to teaching, parenting, foster care, the question of free will, and children’s dreams and fantasy life, among other topics.

Using Inner Humanism Psychotherapy to Treat Children Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Promising Findings from a Retrospective Evaluation


Stephen Budde Ph.D.

Inner Humanism (IH) psychotherapy offers an optimistic new approach for helping children who have been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) feel better about themselves and function better at home and school. In this presentation, Dr. Budde will describe the mechanics of therapeutic change and promising findings from a retrospective analysis of child therapy progress and outcomes. IH articulates a unique form of therapeutic caregiving that aims to nurture the child's motive for positive relationship experiences and help the child build an empirically based sense of effective agency and a new self-confidence. Over time, therapists identify and support the child's motives to turn to the therapist for help and support and away from the debilitating symptoms associated with ASDs, including social isolation, self-soothing behaviors, and conflictual interpersonal interactions.

The sample of the analysis discussed in this presentation consists of 12 children who had a previous diagnosis of an Autism Spectrum Disorder. These children received once or twice weekly Inner Humanism psychotherapy at Smart Love Family Services (SLFS). Data include detailed surveys and interviews with SLFS therapists about their observations, and clinically available feedback from children and parents. The evidence documents how all 12 children were able to form strong therapeutic relationships in which they increasingly communicated with, enjoyed, and turned to the SLFS therapist for help and support. A majority of children showed improvement over the course of treatment on a range of symptoms associated with ASD diagnoses. There was clear evidence of the elimination or marked reductions in severe repetitive behaviors (e.g., hand-flapping) and self-harm behaviors for children with these presenting problems. In addition, unprompted comments by parents and children provided substantial evidence of improved child behavior at school and decreased conflict with family members. While most children made substantial progress in treatment, most also continued to have significant symptoms and social challenges at the end of the data collection. Based on what was learned from the retrospective evaluation, the presentation concludes with a description of a new program at SLFS designed to meet the needs of children with ASD diagnoses and their parents. A prospective evaluation will be conducted as part of this new program.

Friday March 1, 2013, 6-8pm | The Illinois School of Professional Psychology, 225 N. Michigan Avenue, Suite 1300, Chicago, IL 60601

2 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Professional Counselors

Presenter

Stephen Budde Ph.D.
Dr. Budde is Director of Clinical Programs at the Juvenile Protective Association and Senior Researcher at Smart Love Family Services. He was also an Assistant Professor and Senior Researcher at Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago and a Lecturer at the University's School of Social Service Administration. Dr. Budde also serves as Co-Chair of the Research Committee for the Early Childhood Committee of the Illinois Children's Mental Health Partnership. We hope you can join us for this informative and stimulating presentation.



2012 Programs

Exploring FAQs about Intrapsychic Humanism Psychotherapy: A Panel Discussion


Carol Johnson, LCSW, Sara Johnson, PhD, LCSW, Doug Morrison, PhD, Marian Sharkey, PhD, LCSW, Patricia Walker, PhD, Walter Miller, LCSW

Join us for a lively panel discussion addressing FAQs about Inner Humanism psychotherapy. A panel of five experienced Inner Humanism therapists will answer commonly asked questions, as well as engage the audience in a discussion of their own specific questions. Two CEUs are available for social workers, psychologists, and teachers. The seminar will address frequently asked questions about Inner Humanism psychotherapy, including:

  • How is diagnosis and treatability determined?
  • How does the therapist understand clients' symptoms?
  • How are concepts from Intrapsychic Humanism helpful in the treatment of substance abuse?
  • How does the therapist help clients find their own motive to engage in the treatment process?
  • How can therapists track progress in treatment?

Responding to these, as well as participants' questions, is a panel of experienced Inner Humanism psychotherapists:

Please feel free to send your own questions to intrapsychichumanismsociety@gmail.com and we will include them in the discussion as time allows.

October 26,2012, 6-8pm | The Illinois School of Professional Psychology, 225 N. Michigan Avenue, Suite 1300, Chicago, IL 60601

2 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Professional Counselors

Presenters

Carol Johnson, LCSW, Clinical Social Worker, Director of Staff Development, Smart Love Family Services

Sara Johnson, PhD, LCSW, Clinical Social Worker, Director of Training, Smart Love Family Services

Doug Morrison, PhD, Clinical Psychologist, Independent Practice & Northwestern University

Marian Sharkey, PhD, LCSW, Clinical Social Worker, Independent Practice & Northwestern Medical Faculty Foundation

Patricia Walker, PhD, Clinical Psychologist, Independent Practice & Northwestern University

Walter Miller, LCSW (moderator), Clinical Social Worker, Independent Practice

Treating Childhood Behavioral Problems Using the Principles of Intrapsychic Humanism and Smart Love: Part I


Carla Beatrici, Psy.D.

Many children who need support services often struggle with problems in behavioral and emotional self-regulation that can lead to difficult symptoms such as intense meltdowns, tantrums, moodiness, or aggressive behavior. Parents and providers alike can be at a loss not knowing the most effective way to respond to children and may end up engaging in endless power struggles or reacting in punitive ways that only cause more conflict with the child and inadvertently cause the child to feel worse about her/himself. The good news is that much can be done in parent guidance to help parents care for their children in ways that help them to be happier, to lose interest in their negative attention seeking behaviors and to turn to their parents to help them make more positive, constructive choices.

In this two part seminar series, Carla M. Beatrici, Psy.D. and Carol Johnson, LCSW discussed the many unique and effective aspects of the child psychotherapy and parent guidance approach used at Smart Love Family Services, a not for profit counseling agency, to help young children who present with a range of problems, including negative acting out behaviors, such as temper tantrums and aggression. Our approach is based on intrapsychic humanism (IH), a depth psychology and developmental theory that was developed by two highly respected experts in the mental health field, social worker Martha Heineman Pieper, Ph.D. and psychiatrist William J. Pieper, M.D. Inner Humanism® is the application of these ideas to caring for individuals of all ages in psychotherapy and Smart Love® is the application of these discoveries to parenting and child development.

To lay the foundation in Part I, Dr. Beatrici provided a brief overview of IH’s perspective on normal development and the kind of nurture children need to develop inner happiness, or a stable sense of self-esteem and well-being. She also reviewed how children develop needs for unhappiness, including self-sabotaging and negative attention seeking behaviors. To demonstrate the clinical applications of IH, she presented a case of a 4 year old boy with behavioral problems and describe how inner humanism therapy helped him become a happier, more regulated child.

In her case presentation, Dr. Beatrici reviewed the core components of child treatment:

  • Providing a relationship in which all of the child’s feelings and motives are both welcomed and understood and allowing the child to experience the relationship at his/her own pace.
  • Offering the child an accurate, effective model of valuing and caring for the child that she/he will eventually make her/his own.
  • Helping the child choose to respond to life with selfcaretaking motives.
  • Distinguishing between process and content meanings of the child’s communications, which helps the therapist know the child’s struggles and choose the best time to help the child.
  • Helping the child mourn losses in a way that enables the child to respond to losses more effectively and constructively.
  • Helping the child regulate her/his aversive reactions to pleasure, including reactions to treatment progress.

Friday, March, 23 2012 6-8pm | The Illinois School of Professional Psychology, 225 N. Michigan Avenue, Suite 1300, Chicago, IL 60601

2 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Professional Counselors

Presenter

Carla M. Beatrici, Psy.D.
Dr. Beatrici received her Psy.D. at the Illinois School of Professional Psychology. She is a Clinical Psychologist with over 25 years of experience providing psychotherapy to individuals of all ages, with a specialization in child and adolescent mental health and the area of trauma. Dr. Beatrici is the Director of Clinical Services of an outpatient, not-for-profit organization called, Smart Love Family Services, located in Oak Park and Chicago, where she oversees and supervises 25 clinical staff. Dr. Beatrici has developed and implemented staff training programs on child development for mental health and medical professionals in many settings, including Easter Seals, Early Head Start, the American Medical Association, and formerly Children’s Memorial Hospital. For the past 18 years, Dr. Beatrici has been on the adjunct faculty at Loyola University Medical Center as a Clinical Assistant Professor, where she sees patients and teaches Developmental Theories to psychiatry residents.

Parent Guidance in Treating Childhood Behavioral Problems Using the Principles of Intrapsychic Humanism and Smart Love: Part II


Carol Johnson, LCSW

As discussed in Part I of this series, many children who need support services often struggle with problems in behavioral and emotional self-regulation that can lead to difficult symptoms such as intense meltdowns, tantrums, moodiness, or aggressive behavior. Parents and providers alike can be at a loss not knowing the most effective way to respond to children and may end up engaging in endless power struggles or reacting in punitive ways that only cause more conflict with the child and inadvertently cause the child to feel worse about her/himself. The good news is that much can be done in parent guidance to help parents care for their children in ways that help them to be happier, to lose interest in their negative attention seeking behaviors and to turn to their parents to help them make more positive, constructive choices.

Ms. Carol Johnson discussed the many unique and effective aspects of the parent guidance approach used at Smart Love Family Services (SLFS), a not-for-profit counseling agency where she is Director of Staff Development. This approach helps parents tap into their constructive caregiving motives so they can be more effective in offering the accurate and loving caregiving they want to give their child. Ms. Johnson discussed how SLFS staff teach parents the benefits of Smart Love and how to implement these parenting strategies to facilitate their child’s inner happiness. Using this approach, parents learn how to be available to help their child mourn losses, regulate their child’s behavior while enhancing their inner self esteem, and enhance and stabilize their child’s inner happiness at home. Ms. Johnson demonstrated how using these strategies leads to stronger parent-child relationships and makes parenting more enjoyable.

The Smart Love parent guidance approach is based on intrapsychic humanism, a depth psychology and developmental approach that was developed by two highly respected experts in the mental health field, social worker Martha Heineman Pieper, Ph.D. and psychiatrist William J. Pieper, M.D. Inner Humanism is the application of these ideas to caring for individuals of all ages in psychotherapy and Smart Love is the application of these discoveries to parenting and child development.

June 15, 2012, 6-8pm | The Illinois School of Professional Psychology, 225 N. Michigan Avenue, Suite 1300, Chicago, IL 60601

2 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, and Professional Counselors

Presenter

Carol Johnson, LCSW
Ms. Carol Johnson received her MSW from Loyola University Chicago School of Social Work. She is a psychotherapist with 25 years of clinical experience with children, teens, families, and adults in diverse settings, and an experienced parent educator. She was a teacher and school social worker in elementary schools, and a consultant for Easter Seals Head Start Program. Ms Johnson was also an adjunct professor at Loyola University Chicago School of Social Work.