A Warm Welcome to You!

We invite you to attend our upcoming programs.

 
We are a membership, non-profit organization that sponsors Professional Development Programs for mental health professionals suitable to all stages of clinical training. Psychologists, social workers, and professional counselors can expand and refine their clinical expertise and skills while earning continuing education credits. We are a Continuing Education Sponsor of the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation.

We also offer Public Lectures, co-sponsored by Smart Love Family Services, on contemporary issues in diverse fields, including early child development, education, parenting, child welfare, self-help, business, and social decision making.

2020 Programs

Next Program: March 7, 2020

Advanced Skills Therapists Need to Promote Change through the Therapeutic Relationship

Senior clinicians will discuss how therapists can promote change through the therapeutic relationship by developing advanced skills, illustrated using case material, in the following areas:

  1. Understanding and responding to patients’ process communications (often indirect) of their ongoing experiences in the therapeutic relationship in developing, maintaining, and deepening the alliance and promoting intrapsychic development and behavior change.
  2. Recognizing the conflicts clients have about making changes in therapy through listening for the contradictory motives they unknowingly express in their communications. This recognition then permits therapists to respond more accurately to where the client is at and can prevent clients from feeling alienated, misunderstood or prematurely ending treatment.
  3. Using reflective awareness to consider complex factors guiding decisions about whether and how to self-disclose in treatment relationships, including exploring whether the desire to share one's own experience or opinion is in the service of promoting therapeutic motives or personal motives that might lead the process off track.
  4. Recognizing forms of progress in psychotherapy that are often not visible to patients, and in turn, helping patients be aware of and more confident about the progress they are making.

Saturday, March 7, 2020; 1:30-4:30 pm, Sign-In at 1:00 pm; 3 CEs
Complimentary for Members; General Admission: $60.00; Reduced Fees for Early Career Clinicians, Post-graduate Fellows and Students

Register Now!

Presenters

Douglas Morrison, Ph.D.
is a clinical psychologist in independent practice for over 30 years. He is an assistant clinical professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, where he is involved in the training of doctoral-level interns in clinical psychology, and coordinates diversity training for that program. He is a member of the Medical Staff (Doctoral Level Health Professional) at Northwestern Medicine. Previously, he has worked as a staff psychologist and ambulatory services associate director at Northwestern Medicine’s Chemical Dependence Program, and as a clinical team leader at that hospital’s Rehabilitation Program for patients with serious psychiatric disorders. He is a member of the American Psychological Association, the Intrapsychic Humanism Society, and the Illinois Psychological Association, and has served on IPA's Ethics Committee, providing consultation and adjudication for the organization and its members.

Marian Sharkey, Ph.D.
is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in private practice with over 25 years experience working with adults, children and families in a variety of inpatient and outpatient community mental health and hospital settings. Dr. Sharkey received her M.S.W. and Ph.D. from the School of Social Work at Loyola University Chicago where she was the founding editor-in-chief of the school's journal, Praxis: Where Reflection & Practice Meet. She is an adjunct faculty member in the School of Social Work at Loyola University and has also taught at the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. Dr. Sharkey has presented at local and national conferences on the topics of the reflective use of theory in clinical practice, trauma-informed treatment, promoting student scholarship in social work education, and the theoretical principles and practice of Inner Humanism. She is on the board of the Intrapsychic Humanism Society and serves as Secretary.

Annemarie Slobig, Psy.D.
is a clinical psychologist and the chair of the Clinical Psychology Department at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology in Chicago. Previously she led the PsyD program at the Illinois School of Professional Psychology where she served in leadership roles for over 20 years. Dr. Slobig has worked in a wide variety of clinical settings, including inpatient and outpatient hospitals, residential treatment, community mental health, transitional housing, and independent practice. Dr. Slobig is a member of the American Psychological Association, the Society for Humanistic Psychology (APA Division 32), and the Intrapsychic Humanism Society (IHS) and serves on the IHS board. She also has interests in group and organizational dynamics, group relations training, supervisory processes, and therapist development - especially as they pertain to personal growth and learning about diversity. She has a private psychotherapy and consultation practice in Oak Park, IL.

Patricia Walker, Ph.D.
is a licensed clinical psychologist in private practice with over thirty years experience providing psychotherapy for adults experiencing difficulties in their personal and professional lives. She also provides psychotherapy consultation to mental health professionals. Dr. Walker is President of the Intrasychic Humanism Society. She is also Chair of the Women’s Issues Section of the Illinois Psychological Association. She is on Faculty at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, serving on the selection and training committee of the clinical psychology doctoral internship, and teaching a seminar on ethics in reflective practice. She is a member of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Walker has given professional talks on ethics in reflective practice, Inner Humanism psychotherapy, and helping women develop stable self-esteem and minds of their own, as well as talks to the general public on overcoming gender bias and work-life balance.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe how understanding and responding to patients’ process communications about their ongoing experiences in the therapeutic relationship can aid in maintaining a constructive alliance.
  2. Describe how recognizing clients' contradictory motives about changing, which are unknowingly expressed in their communications, can aid therapists in responding to where clients are at, and prevent alliance ruptures.
  3. Identify key questions to guide decisions about therapist self-disclosure in psychotherapy.
  4. Describe indicators of progress that are often not visible to patients, and understand how facilitating patients' awareness of these changes contributes to their confidence about their progress in treatment.

Additional 2020 IH Society Programs

Spring Program

Co-Sponsored by the Juvenile Protective Association

The Walter D. Miller, LCSW Lecture
"Mental Health Consultants Helping Teachers 'Connect to Kids': Relationship-Based Approaches to Deepening Understanding and Support for Children with Emotional and Behavioral Problems"


May 16, 2020: 1:30-4:30 pm, 3 CEs

This presentation will describe an innovative relationship based approach to mental health consultation for teachers of children in pre-K through 3rd grade in the Connect 2 Kids (C2K) program at the Juvenile Protective Association (JPA). The introduction will describe the intense pressure on many teachers of young children to produce academic gains and behavioral compliance, the goals and overall approach of C2K, and key evaluation findings from JPA’s recent Connect 2 Kindergarten pilot. The bulk of the presentation will articulate how clinical concepts and ideas from Intrapsychic Humanism (IH), which form much of the theoretical foundation for C2K consultation, are used to help teachers and other educators understand and support children with serious emotional and behavioral symptoms in the classroom. The IH topics that will be discussed include how traumatic nurture leads to internalized motives for unhappiness (e.g., negative attention seeking), how meaningful change in social emotional functioning occurs primarily through caring relationships, how unrealistic expectations set children up for failure, the importance of maintaining closeness when children are upset, how to tailor responses and interventions based on the child’s communications and constructive vs. fixated motives, how to develop child support plans, how to identify meaningful signs of progress, and how teachers can remain optimistic in the face of setbacks. Case examples will illustrate the application of IH concepts in both student-teacher and teacher-consultant relationships. We will conclude with a discussion of the implications of IH for deepening our understanding of how caring relationships can enhance the well-being and social emotional development of young children in educational settings.

Presenters

Stephen Budde, PhD, LCSW,
is the Executive Vice President of the Juvenile Protective Association (JPA) and a Lecturer at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration. Dr. Budde has over 35 years of experience in child welfare and mental health as a researcher, teacher, administrator, trainer, consultant, and therapist. His research and practice interests include relationship oriented intervention strategies; mental health interventions and consultation for professionals in early childhood programs and elementary schools; engagement and retention of children and parents in services in child abuse prevention, mental health, and foster care programs; mental health and psychiatric hospitalization outcomes for children in care; conceptualizing and measuring child well-being; child protection decision making; residential care; and philosophy of science. Dr. Budde has led or participated in numerous evaluations and studies at JPA, previously as Senior Researcher and Assistant Professor at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, and at Smart Love Family Services. He has provided expert support on best practices, evaluation, and quality improvement to the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services, Chicago Children’s Advocacy Center, Children’s Advocacy Centers of Illinois, Illinois Children’s Justice Task Force, and multiple private foundations, child welfare agencies, and mental health providers. Dr. Budde designed and oversaw the initial development, clinical services, implementation, and evaluation of JPA’s award winning school based mental health services. His primary roles in JPA’s mental health consultation services for teachers, including the Connect 2 Kindergarten (C2K) pilot, have involved articulating the clinical and programmatic theory of change, evaluating outcomes, and providing clinical consultation to the consultants who work with teachers.

Katie Gleason, MS, LCSW,
has been with Juvenile Protective Association (JPA) since 2012. Katie serves as a Mental Health Consultant and Director of JPA’s Connect 2 Kids (C2K), a program partnering with underserved schools in Chicago to provide expert mental health consultation, training, and support to educators. She has overseen the development and growth of C2K, supporting its expansion from a pilot program focusing on Kindergarten, to a program that now serves educators ins Pre-K through 4th grade in schools impacted by community violence and socioeconomic and racial inequities. In addition to her work with C2K, Katie has experience providing school-based and home-based psychotherapy to children and caregivers. Her practice with children, families, and educators, incorporates knowledge of child development, is trauma-informed, and influenced by several relational theories. Katie received her BA in Psychology from the University of Colorado, an MS in Child Development from the Erikson Institute, and her MSW from Loyola University Chicago.

Fall Program

The William J. Pieper, M.D. Lecture
"Q&A with Martha Heineman Pieper, Ph.D. on Inner Humanism Psychotherapy for Adults, Adolescents, and Children"


November 7, 2020; 1:30-4:30 pm, 3 CEs

Dr. Martha Heineman Pieper, Ph.D. will answer questions from participants on the principles of Inner Humanism psychotherapy and their application to treating adults and adolescents in individual psychotherapy, children in play therapy, parent counseling, couples therapy, and consultation with preschool teachers. Some questions of general interest will be submitted in advance by the clinical staff and trainees at Smart Love Family Services. The majority of the program will be dedicated to answering questions posed by attendees. Anyone who would like an orientation ahead of the program can find a succinct overview of Inner Humanism psychotherapy in The Privilege of Being a Therapist as well as other relevant presentations and articles at Articles - Martha Heineman Pieper, Ph.D.

Presenter

Martha Heineman Pieper, Ph.D.,
is an author and psychotherapist who works with children and parents, and serves as a consultant to agencies and other mental health professionals. She is a founding board member of Smart Love Family Services, for which she provides ongoing consultation and insight to the clinical and early childhood education staff. She also serves on the Board of the Intrapsychic Humanism Society. Both of these non-profit agencies are based on Intrapsychic Humanism, the comprehensive psychology of child development, psychopathology and treatment developed by Dr. Pieper and her late husband, William J. Pieper, MD.

Dr. Pieper authored two best-selling, award winning children's books, Mommy, Daddy, I Had a Bad Dream! and Jilly's Terrible Temper Tantrums: And How She Outgrew Them. And she co-authored with Dr. William Pieper the best-selling parenting book, Smart Love: The Comprehensive Guide to Understanding, Regulating, and Enjoying Your Child; the popular adult self-help book, Addicted to Unhappiness: How Hidden Motives for Unhappiness Keep You From Creating the Life You Truly Want, And What You Can Do (2nd Edition); and Intrapsychic Humanism: An Introduction to a Comprehensive Psychology and Philosophy of Mind. She has written and presented on Inner Humanism psychotherapy, and also on applications of the theory of Intrapsychic Humanism to teaching, parenting, foster care, the question of free will, and children’s dreams and fantasy life, among other topics.
 

Our Most Recent Programs

"When Our Choices Are Not Really Our Own: How Hidden Motives for Unhappiness Keep Us from Creating the Life We Truly Want, and What Can Be Done"

Dr. Martha Heineman Pieper presented a new understanding of what goes wrong when choices are unfree, namely that an unrecognized addiction to unhappiness lies behind many of the large and small decisions individuals experience as freely chosen. She suggested ways in which parents, therapists, teachers, and individuals can enhance their ability to help others as well as themselves develop the capacity to make good choices that are not in the service of hidden agendas. Dr. Pieper framed her understanding in the broader context of selected philosophical and psychological views of freedom of choice while illuminating some limitations of these views.

Saturday April 13, 2019, 3-5 pm

Presenter

Martha Heineman Pieper, Ph.D.
is an author and psychotherapist who works with children and parents, and serves as a consultant to agencies and other mental health professionals. She is a founding board member of Smart Love Family Services, for which she provides ongoing consultation and insight to the clinical and early childhood education staff. She also serves on the Board of the Intrapsychic Humanism Society. Both of these non-profit agencies are based on Intrapsychic Humanism, the comprehensive psychology of child development, psychopathology and treatment developed by Dr. Pieper and her late husband, William J. Pieper, MD.

Dr. Pieper authored two best-selling, award winning children's books, Mommy, Daddy, I Had a Bad Dream! and Jilly's Terrible Temper Tantrums: And How She Outgrew Them. And she co-authored with Dr. William Pieper the best-selling parenting book, Smart Love: The Comprehensive Guide to Understanding, Regulating, and Enjoying Your Child; the popular adult self-help book, Addicted to Unhappiness: How Hidden Motives for Unhappiness Keep You From Creating the Life You Truly Want, And What You Can Do (2nd Edition); and Intrapsychic Humanism: An Introduction to a Comprehensive Psychology and Philosophy of Mind. She has written and presented on Inner Humanism psychotherapy, and also on applications of the theory of Intrapsychic Humanism to teaching, parenting, foster care, the question of free will, and children’s dreams and fantasy life, among other topics.

Co-Sponsored by the Women's Issues Section of the Illinois Psychological Association

Q:
“In the Cultural Awakening of the #MeToo Movement, How Can Psychotherapists Help?”
   
A:
“Using the Therapeutic Relationship to Build Her Inner Strength, Resistance to Mistreatment, and Pursuit of Mutually Caring Relationships”

Carla Beatrici, Psy.D., Marian Sharkey, Ph.D., Tamara Garrity, Psy.D., and Michael Zakalik, Psy.D.

Experienced psychotherapists discussed the impact negative gender related messages can have on female teens and adults. Using clinical material from teen and adult cases, the presenters described how the therapeutic relationship can strengthen and stabilize genuine, internalized self-worth, constructive self-caretaking, and pursuit of mutually caring interpersonal relationships. The presenters included how to help female teens and women within the therapeutic relationship develop their own minds, take themselves seriously, care for themselves while also caring for others, use their voices to share losses and mistreatment in relationships, stand up for themselves, and turn away from relationships that are harmful to them. They addressed how male therapists can think about their roles, and how to help parents provide accurate caregiving responses that foster genuine self-worth. There was plenty of time for questions and discussion with audience participants.

June 22, 2019, 3-5 pm | Loyola University, Lewis Tower, Beane Hall, 13th Floor, 111 E. Pearson

Photos from the event:

Presenters

Carla M. Beatrici, Psy.D.
Dr. Carla Beatrici is a Clinical Psychologist with over 25 years of clinical experience with a specialization in child and adolescent mental health. Dr. Beatrici is the Director of Clinical Services of Smart Love Family Services. Dr. Beatrici is an adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor at Loyola Medical Center.

 

Marian Sharkey, Ph.D., LCSW
Dr. Sharkey is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with 25 years of clinical experience in inpatient and outpatient hospital settings, community mental health, and private practice. She is an adjunct faculty member in the School of Social Work at Loyola University Chicago and has been an instructor at the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago.

 

Tamara T. Garrity, Psy.D.
Dr. Tamara Garrity is a Clinical Psychologist with over 20 years of experience. She is the Director of Training and Staff Supervisor at Smart Love Family Services. Along with treating patients, she manages the Internship and Postdoctoral training program. Dr. Garrity is a bilingual, Spanish-speaking psychologist.

 

Michael Zakalik, Psy.D.
Dr. Michael Zakalik is a licensed clinical psychologist with over 15 years of experience working with diverse populations of children, adolescents, parents and adults. Dr. Zakalik supervises doctoral candidates and staff at Smart Love Family Services. He has provided parent education seminars on important mental health topics.

Contemporary Ethical Dilemmas in the Psychotherapy Relationship: A Reflective Approach

Susan S. Zoline, Ph.D.

This workshop will address contemporary and sometimes vexing ethical dilemmas which arise in clinical practice, requiring clinicians to make difficult judgments regarding perceived benefit and potential harm to our clients and other impacted parties. Topics will include confidentiality/disclosure of information (particularly with regard to children, teens and families), management of high risk or crisis situations such as suicide and risk of violence towards others, and emerging standards regarding the interface of technology and psychotherapy. Special emphasis will be placed upon the centrality of the psychotherapy relationship and its foundation of trust and integrity, as well as the critical role of therapist self-reflection, as each of these factors is essential in providing ethically optimal care. Strategies for utilizing informed decision making while balancing clinical, ethical, legal and risk management considerations will be presented. Case vignettes will be examined and group discussion will be integrated into the presentation to illustrate the grey areas surrounding these complex issues.

October 5, 2019, 2-5 pm | Loyola University, Lewis Tower, Beane Hall, 13th Floor, 111 E. Pearson

3 Ethics CEs for Social Workers, Psychologists, and Professional Counselors

Presenter

Susan Zoline, Ph.D.
Susan Zoline, Ph.D. is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist who has been involved in practicing, teaching and consulting in the Chicago area for over thirty-five years. Dr. Zoline was a Professor of Psychology and University Fellow at the Illinois School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University, Chicago, where she taught clinical masters and doctoral students for thirty years. More recently, Dr. Zoline is a Clinical Faculty in the Psy.D. program in Clinical Psychology at Adler University. Dr. Zoline’s areas of professional expertise include professional ethics, suicide, violence and abuse assessment and intervention, clinical supervision and risk management. Dr. Zoline is a longstanding member of the Illinois Psychological Association Ethics Committee which she currently Co-Chairs. She has worked clinically in a broad variety of settings and regularly consults and provides workshops to mental health and other professionals both locally and nationally on topics related to professional ethics.